Tour in central Cotroceni

Walking tour in Cotroceni - central partDear readers,

I would like to propose you an walking architectural tour in Cotroceni quarter, in its central part, encompassing the area between St Elefterie Str. and Dr. Lister Str. The tour is scheduled to take place this Sunday 26 August 2018, between 11.30h – 13.30h. This cultural excursion could be of interest to any of you visiting Romania’s capital as a tourist or on business, looking to understand the character of this metropolis through discovering its peculiar and fascinating old architecture.

The focus points of the central part of Cotroceni are its two parish churches, the Old St Elefterie, an edifice containing 18th c. Brancovan style architecture vestiges, serving now the deaf community, which sits on a former island in the marshes around the Dambovita river, before the quarter started to be developed in the second half of the 19th century, giving us an idea about the local environmental history, and the grand New St Elefterie church, designed by arch. Constantin Iotzu in the 1930s, in the Neoromanian style, its Byzantine persuasion variety, in a period of Romanian national triumphalism. The residential buildings date mostly from the Read more

Tour in central Cotroceni

Walking tour in Cotroceni - central partDear readers,

I would like to propose you an walking architectural tour in Cotroceni quarter, in its central part, encompassing the area between St Elefterie Str. and Dr. Lister Str. The tour is scheduled to take place this Saturday 3 February 2018, between 11.30h – 13.30h. This cultural excursion could be of interest to any of you visiting Romania’s capital as a tourist or on business, looking to understand the character of this metropolis through discovering its peculiar and fascinating old architecture.

The focus points of the central part of Cotroceni are its two parish churches, the Old St Elefterie, an edifice containing 18th c. Brancovan style architecture vestiges, serving now the deaf community, which sits on a former island in the marshes around the Dambovita river, before the quarter started to be developed in the second half of the 19th century, giving us an idea about the local environmental history, and the grand New St Elefterie church, designed by arch. Constantin Iotzu in the 1930s, in the Neoromanian style, its Byzantine persuasion variety, in a period of Romanian national triumphalism. The residential buildings date mostly from the Read more

Introduction to west Cotroceni tour – 21 May 2017

The introduction, for the benefit of the participants, at the Historic Houses of Romania walking tour in west Cotroceni area of Bucharest, the 21 May 2017 edition.

***********************************************

I endeavour through this series of periodic articles to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural history and heritage.

***********************************************

If you plan acquiring or selling a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in sourcing and transacting the property, specialist research, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contactpage of this weblog.

Wrought iron gate with cubist pattern

Bellow is a fascinating cubist-like design embellishing a wrought iron gate structure, which I encountered in Cotroceni quarter of Bucharest and have also shown to the participants at my architectural history tour, which took place in June past. It is another testimonial of the effervescent creative years of Bucharest that span the inter-war period, considered as a golden age for this city. The gate is in a run down state and needs urgent caring attention, but I doubt that it would ever receive any attention from the contemporary Bucharest people, having in fact a much higher chance to reach the scrapyard and be replaced by a new and “beautiful”, in their uncouth eyes, production line gate from a DIY shop.

Wrought iron gate with cubist pattern, Art Deco style house dating from the mid-1930s, Cotroceni area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)
Wrought iron gate with cubist pattern, Art Deco style house dating from the mid-1930s, Cotroceni area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)
Wrought iron gate with cubist pattern, Art Deco style house dating from the mid-1930s, Cotroceni area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)
Inversed colour filter: wrought iron gate with cubist pattern, Art Deco style house dating from the mid-1930s, Cotroceni area, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

***********************************************

I endeavour through this series of periodic articles to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural history and heritage.

***********************************************

If you plan acquiring or selling a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in sourcing and transacting the property, specialist research, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contactpage of this weblog.

From yesterday’s architectural photography tour of Cotroceni historic quarter, Bucharest

Architectural details, images from yesterday's photo-tour of Cotroceni historic quarter, Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

Yesterday I organised the first from my planed series of architectural photography tours in Bucharest and nearby towns. The area scheduled for exploration was Cotroceni historic quarter in west-central Bucharest. The participants were very keen to find out all matters of architectural and social history peculiar to this area of Romania’s capital and how to perfect their architectural photography skills using point and shoot cameras. I have been pleased to be their guide and trust that my explanations, pointing out particular details, advising about basic architectural photography techniques and making sense of a complex and apparently chaotic historic architectural landscape were well received by the participants. A sample of the exquisite architectural images shot yesterday in Cotroceni is presented in the above collage. The quarter boasts mainly Neo-Romanian and Art Deco style residential architecture and is one of the best preserved built heritage areas of Bucharest.

The next Sunday (12 June ’11, 9am-12.00) architectural photography tour will take place in Mantuleasa historic quarter, east central Bucharest; meeting point: University subway passage, in front of Bucharest Tourist Information booth. I look forward to seeing you there and go exploring this more than fascinating city corner!

Valentin Mandache (author of Historic Houses of Romania blog)

With participants at the architectural photography tour in Cotroceni on 5 June 2011 (photo:Romulus Andrei Bena)

***********************************************

I endeavour through this series of periodic articles to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural history and heritage.

***********************************************

If you plan acquiring or selling a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in sourcing and transacting the property, specialist research, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contactpage of this weblog.

Classical echoes in an Art Deco design doorway

Art Deco style doorway, embellishing an early 1930s house in the Cotroceni area of Bucharest (©Valentin Mandache)

There is a classical theme discernible in the design of the doorway assembly presented above, namely that of the Ionic order. That can be seen in the fluting (vertical grooves) of the door’s two side columns, feature also suggested by the vertical bars forming the gridiron of the door window, which is poignantly crowned by Ionic order capital motifs (the ram’s horn). I like the way how the 1930s architect adapted with great ease these classical elements to the Art Deco design scheme, without even a hint of dissonance between the ancient and modern patterns. Even the “S” shaped door handle participates to that wonderful play of proportions and contours.

***********************************************

I endeavor through this series of daily articles to inspire appreciation of the historic houses of Romania, a virtually undiscovered, but fascinating chapter of European architectural history and heritage.

***********************************************

If you plan acquiring a historic property in Romania or start a renovation project, I would be delighted to advice you in sourcing the property, specialist research, planning permissions, restoration project management, etc. To discuss your particular plan please see my contact details in the Contact page of this weblog.